The Hardest of Hearts Survive

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Eugene Delacroix
Moroccan Sketchbook: Head of a Lion 
1832
Watercolor on paper
Musée du Louvre 

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Eugene Delacroix

Moroccan Sketchbook: Head of a Lion 

1832

Watercolor on paper

Musée du Louvre 


astra-inclinat:

John William Godward
In the Days of Sappho (Art Detail)
1904

astra-inclinat:

John William Godward

In the Days of Sappho (Art Detail)

1904



The Court of Faerie by Thomas Maybank

The Court of Faerie by Thomas Maybank


templeofapelles:

detail The Lament for Icarus, 1898
Herbert Draper

templeofapelles:

detail
The Lament for Icarus, 1898
Herbert Draper


mymodernmet:

Serving both as a bride and an artist, Sheika Lateefa gave the company Designlab Events complete freedom to create this spectacular cloud installation for her wedding. The installation, titled Lucid Dream, consists of 15,000 light sticks, 65,000 Swarovski crystals, 4,000 paper cranes, and other materials that swirl overhead in an amazing sky.


the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Rembrandt (1606-1669)
The Woman Taken in Adultery
1644
Oil on oak
The National Gallery, London
From their website:
     Rembrandt portrays a Bible story about the nature of God’s forgiveness for those who sin. The subject comes from the Gospel of Saint John. The Scribes and Pharisees, knowing that Jesus took pity on wrong-doers, tried to catch him condoning disobedience to the Law. They brought a woman to him who had been caught in the act of adultery and said, ‘Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. Now in the law Moses commanded us to stone such. What do you say about her?’ Christ replied, ‘He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her’ (John 8: 3-7). In Rembrandt’s interpretation, Christ’s stature is exaggerated to make him seem taller (and by analogy morally superior) than those trying to trick him. The work is dated 1644, although it is more characteristic of his paintings of the 1630s in its detail, colouring, quality of light, and the small scale of the figures. It shows Rembrandt’s gift as a colourist; although the colours are generally muted, there are balancing touches of brightness, for example in the dull gold of the throne and the altar.
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG45

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Rembrandt (1606-1669)

The Woman Taken in Adultery

1644

Oil on oak

The National Gallery, London

From their website:

     Rembrandt portrays a Bible story about the nature of God’s forgiveness for those who sin. The subject comes from the Gospel of Saint John. The Scribes and Pharisees, knowing that Jesus took pity on wrong-doers, tried to catch him condoning disobedience to the Law. They brought a woman to him who had been caught in the act of adultery and said, ‘Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. Now in the law Moses commanded us to stone such. What do you say about her?’ Christ replied, ‘He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her’ (John 8: 3-7). In Rembrandt’s interpretation, Christ’s stature is exaggerated to make him seem taller (and by analogy morally superior) than those trying to trick him. The work is dated 1644, although it is more characteristic of his paintings of the 1630s in its detail, colouring, quality of light, and the small scale of the figures. It shows Rembrandt’s gift as a colourist; although the colours are generally muted, there are balancing touches of brightness, for example in the dull gold of the throne and the altar.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG45


the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Rembrandt (1606-1669)
A Woman Bathing in a Stream
1654
Oil on oak
The National Gallery, London
From their website:
     The model is probably Hendrickje Stoffels (about 1625/6 - 1663). She lived in Rembrandt’s household from about 1649 until her death. She became his common-law wife and bore him a daughter, Cornelia, who was baptised on 30 October 1654 (the year of this painting). It has been suggested that the sumptuous red robe on the river bank indicates that the painting might be a sketch for a religious or mythological picture; the model might be in the guise of an Old Testament heroine, such as Susanna or Bathsheba, or the goddess Diana, who were all spied upon by men while bathing. However, there is no evidence for a completed painting after this work and, moreover, Rembrandt did not use oil sketches as preparation for larger-scale paintings.The handling of the paint is unusually spontaneous. The picture appears unfinished in some parts, for example, in the shadow at the hem of the raised chemise, the right arm and the left shoulder, but it was clearly finished to Rembrandt’s satisfaction since he signed and dated it.
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG54

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Rembrandt (1606-1669)

A Woman Bathing in a Stream

1654

Oil on oak

The National Gallery, London

From their website:

     The model is probably Hendrickje Stoffels (about 1625/6 - 1663). She lived in Rembrandt’s household from about 1649 until her death. She became his common-law wife and bore him a daughter, Cornelia, who was baptised on 30 October 1654 (the year of this painting). It has been suggested that the sumptuous red robe on the river bank indicates that the painting might be a sketch for a religious or mythological picture; the model might be in the guise of an Old Testament heroine, such as Susanna or Bathsheba, or the goddess Diana, who were all spied upon by men while bathing. However, there is no evidence for a completed painting after this work and, moreover, Rembrandt did not use oil sketches as preparation for larger-scale paintings.The handling of the paint is unusually spontaneous. The picture appears unfinished in some parts, for example, in the shadow at the hem of the raised chemise, the right arm and the left shoulder, but it was clearly finished to Rembrandt’s satisfaction since he signed and dated it.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG54



the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840)
Winter Landscape
c. 1811
Oil on canvas
The National Gallery, London
From their website:
     Friedrich combined landscape motifs with religious symbolism, and this picture represents the hope for salvation through the Christian faith. In the foreground a crippled man has abandoned his crutches and sits against a rock with his hands raised in prayer before a crucifix. The rocks and evergreen trees may be interpreted as symbols of faith, and the visionary Gothic cathedral emerging from the mist evokes the promise of life after death. There is a second version of this picture in the Museum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte, Dortmund.
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG6517

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840)

Winter Landscape

c. 1811

Oil on canvas

The National Gallery, London

From their website:

     Friedrich combined landscape motifs with religious symbolism, and this picture represents the hope for salvation through the Christian faith. In the foreground a crippled man has abandoned his crutches and sits against a rock with his hands raised in prayer before a crucifix. The rocks and evergreen trees may be interpreted as symbols of faith, and the visionary Gothic cathedral emerging from the mist evokes the promise of life after death. There is a second version of this picture in the Museum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte, Dortmund.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG6517


the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830)
Portrait of the Hon. Emily Mary Lamb (1787-1869), later Countess Cowper and Viscountess Palmerston 
1803
Oil on canvas
The National Gallery, London
From their website:
     Lawrence depicts the 16-year old Emily Lamb as though in motion, her head turning back towards the viewer. The pose is one with a long tradition in the history of portraiture, but Lawrence treats it with a freshness reflected in the informality and economy of his brushwork. The painting was commissioned by Emily’s father, Peniston Lamb, 1st Earl Melbourne, who can also be seen in the Gallery. Emily Lamb went on to become an influential, politically prominent society hostess, first marrying Peter Leopold Clavering-Cowper, 5th Earl Cowper. After his death in 1839 she married Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, who served twice as Prime Minister between 1855 and 1858 and again from 1859 to 1865. Her brother, Viscount Melbourne, also served as Prime Minister.
http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG6617

the-hardest-of-hearts-survive:

Sir Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830)

Portrait of the Hon. Emily Mary Lamb (1787-1869), later Countess Cowper and Viscountess Palmerston 

1803

Oil on canvas

The National Gallery, London

From their website:

     Lawrence depicts the 16-year old Emily Lamb as though in motion, her head turning back towards the viewer. The pose is one with a long tradition in the history of portraiture, but Lawrence treats it with a freshness reflected in the informality and economy of his brushwork. The painting was commissioned by Emily’s father, Peniston Lamb, 1st Earl Melbourne, who can also be seen in the Gallery. Emily Lamb went on to become an influential, politically prominent society hostess, first marrying Peter Leopold Clavering-Cowper, 5th Earl Cowper. After his death in 1839 she married Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, who served twice as Prime Minister between 1855 and 1858 and again from 1859 to 1865. Her brother, Viscount Melbourne, also served as Prime Minister.

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/NG6617